Public Meetings Round 1 - Display Boards

Three (3) Public Meetings were held as part of Round 1 Consultation:

  • Wednesday April 18, 2018 at George Vanier Secondary School
  • Thursday April 19, 2018 at York Mills Collegiate Institute
  • Saturday April 21, 2018 at Thorncliffe Park Public School

The content of the main display boards available at the public meetings was transcribed below for accessibility purposes. Please note that information was also available about the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan and the City’s Future Rapid Transit Network.  If you would like to receive a PDF of the display boards or have any questions about them, please email us at reliefline@toronto.ca. If you require further accommodation to access any of this content, please call us at 416-338-1065.

Board 1: The Relief Line North and South

The city is growing, and so is our rapid transit network. The City of Toronto, TTC and Metrolinx are planning the Relief Line to relieve crowding on Line 1 Yonge and provide more travel options to transit riders throughout Toronto. The Relief Line is being studied in two parts: Relief Line North and Relief Line South.

A simplified map of downtown Toronto shows line 1 Yonge-University as a yellow line from Spadina to Bloor-Yonge and line 2 Bloor-Danforth as a green line from Spadina station to Pape Station. A grey line shows the Relief Line South, which connects Osgoode Station to Pape Station via Queen Station. Above Pape Station, the line becomes an arrow pointing north representing the Relief Line North, which is currently under study.

RELIEF LINE NORTH

  • Alignment and stations to be determined through study now being initiated
  • First round of engagement happening now

RELIEF LINE SOUTH

  • TPAP being initiated in April 2018
  • Design underway for 8 stations from Osgoode to Pape
  • Conceptual design & costing underway
  • Draft Environmental Project Report 90% complete
  • Report back to Council late 2019
Board 2: Relief Line - 2009 to now

2009

  • City Council approves Yonge North Extension EA (contingent on Relief Line)
  • City/TTC begin study to determine need for Relief Line

2012

  • TTC's Downtown Rapid Transit Expansion Study concludes that Relief Line and GO improvements will help ease crowding

2013

  • Relief Line identified as "Next Wave" of transit projects in Metrolinx's Big Move plan
  • Relief Line identified by Metrolinx as a priority for future transit investments

2014

  • Relief Line South Project Assessment launches
  • City/TTC begin plans for preferred route and station locations for the Relief Line South

2015

  • Metrolinx's Yonge Relief Network Study recommends a subway from Downtown to Don Mills Station
  • Metrolinx Board gives direction to advance planning of Relief Line South, Yonge Subway Extension, and assess a northerly extension of the Relief Line

2016

  • City Council approves:
    • Relief Line South Initial Business Case
    • Preferred Alignment for Relief Line South (Pape to Downtown via Queen/Eastern) subject to assessment of an additional alignment west of Pape

2017

  • City Council:
    • Approves Carlaw alignment for Relief Line South between Gerrard and Queen
    • Authorizes commencing TPAP, proceeding with conceptual design
    • Authorizes developing an initial business case for Relief Line North

2018

  • The Relief Line North Project Team begins work to identify the route alignment and station locations
Board 3: Why do we need the Relief Line North

Problem Statement:

A linear graphic that looks like a transit line presents the following information. First stop: The Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA) is experiencing unprecedented population growth. The population is projected to grow from 7 million today to over 10 million in 2041, which represents a 41% increase. Second stop: The GTHA is also experiencing unprecedented employment growth. The number of jobs in the region is projected to grow from 3.6 million today to 4.8 million in 2041, which represents a 33% increase. Third stop: Toronto’s current transit network has limited capacity. A simplified graphic shows that people who currently travel on buses and streetcar from the East end to transfer onto Line 1 Yonge to go downtown could be intercepted by a Relief Line located east of line 1 Yonge. Fourth stop: As a result, Toronto’s transit network is congested, especially line 1. Fifth stop: Another consequence is that people have limited access to opportunities, including jobs, school, and various services.

Current Crowding on line 1 Yonge:

 A graphic shows crowding on line 1 Yonge during Morning rush hour between each station from Finch to Union for years 2001, 2006, 2011, 2016. Three levels of crowding are represented: green means the trains are less than 85% full (Sufficient capacity to serve demand), yellow means the trains are between 85% and 100% full (approaching capacity, crowded vehicles that slow down service and may not accommodate localized surges in demand), and red means 100% full (capacity exceeded, trains bypass waiting passengers frequently). 2001: The line is green between Finch and Bloor-Yonge, yellow between Bloor-Yonge and Dundas, and green again between Dundas and Union. 2006: The line is green between Finch and Bloor-Yonge, red between Bloor-Yonge and College, yellow between College and Dundas, and green again between Dundas and Union. 2011: The line is green between Finch and Lawrence, yellow between Lawrence and St. Clair, red between St. Clair and Dundas, and green again between Dundas and Union. 2016: The line is green between Finch and Eglinton, yellow between Eglinton and Bloor-Yonge, red between Bloor-Yonge and Dundas, and green again between Dundas and Union. The section between Lawrence and Bloor-Yonge is circled for years 2011 and 2016 with the following caption: “With the roll-out of the new Toronto Rocket subway fleet in 2014, capacity increased by 10%. This has resulted in a minor improvement for certain sections, however Bloor Station to Dundas Station remains at or above capacity.”

The aim of the Relief Line North project assessment is to:

Relieve congestion
Line 1 currently operates over capacity during peak travel times. A continuation of Relief Line South, travelling north – from Pape Station – will provide more capacity and reduce overcrowding, helping  to improve the performance of the entire regional transportation network.

Improve experience, health and environment
Rapid transit options reduce per trip greenhouse gas emissions, provide an alternative to car use, and are a more active form of transportation helping to protect our environment and our health.

Connect people and places
Relief Line North will provide improved transit access for more communities not yet served by rapid transit, helping to create connected places and better connect people with urban centres, employment nodes and regional destinations.

Grow with the Region
By 2041, the GTHA, which had a population of nearly 7 million in 2016, is expected to grow to over 10 million people and 4.8 million jobs.

Board 4: Relief Line North study area

This map is showing the Relief Line North study area, from Steeles Avenue in the north, Victoria Park Avenue to the east, Pape Station to the south, and Yonge Street to the west. Also included in this map are existing rapid transit lines, shown as solid lines, such as Line 1 Yonge-University, Line 2 Bloor-Danforth, Line 4 Sheppard, GO Rail, and UP Express. The Eglinton Crosstown and Sheppard East LRT, which are projects currently in delivery, are shown as dotted lines. Note that projects in delivery are under construction or in the engineering design stage. Eleven interchange stations are shown as white circles and the Relief Line South route is shown in black with white dashes in the south portion of the map.

The study area will likely be reduced as the study progresses and corridor options are refined.

Questions:

Using the study area map as a reference, tell us about:

  1. Where you travel in this area
  2. Where you have difficulty getting to in this area
Board 5: Long list of potential station areas

This map outlines the long list of potential station areas being considered for the Relief Line North project. Each station area is represented by red circles with a letter inside the circle. All station areas are located within the study area that is represented by a black dotted line. Potential station areas are found along the perimeter of the study area as well as inside the study area. Station Area A is in the vicinity of York Mills and Bayview, near the York Mills Shopping Centre and the York Mills Arena. Station Area B is in the vicinity of Leslie and Blythwood near Sunnybrook Hospital and the Glendon Campus of York University. Station Area C is in Thorncliffe Park. Station Area D is near the Pape Village BIA, in the vicinity of Pape and Mortimer/ Cosburn/ O’Connor. Station Area E is in the vicinity of York Mills and Leslie, near the York Mills Gardens Shopping Plaza and York Mills employment area. Station Area F is in the vicinity of Lawrence and Leslie, near Edwards Gardens and Toronto Botanical Gardens. Station Area G is in Flemingdon Park. Station Area H is in the vicinity of Woodbine and O’Connor. Station Area I is in the vicinity of Lawrence and Don Mills, near the Shops at Don Mills. Station Area J is in the vicinity of York Mills and the Richmond Hill Corridor, near the York Mills employment area. Station Area K is in the vicinity of Don Mills and York Mills, near the York Mills employment area. Station Area L is in the vicinity of Concorde Place/ Wynford Drive mixed use area. Station Area M is in the vicinity of O’Connor and Bermondsey, near the Bermondsey employment area. Station Area N is in the vicinity of Victoria Park and Lawrence, near the Victoria Terrace Shopping Plaza. Station Area O is in the vicinity of Victoria Park and Ellesmere, near Parkway Mall. Station Area P is in the vicinity of Victoria Park and Sheppard Avenue East, near the Consumers Road Business Park. Station area Q is in the vicinity of Victoria Park and Finch Avenue, Pleasantview Community Centre and the Newnham Campus of Seneca College. Station area R is in the vicinity of Victoria Park and Steeles, near a designated employment area. Station area S is in the vicinity of Finch and Don Mills, near the Newnham Campus of Seneca College. Station area T is in the vicinity of Steeles and Don Mills. The black circles on the map indicate existing and potential interchange stations and the yellow, green, purple and white circles indicate existing, in delivery and in development inline stations. Interchange station areas being considered are on the Line 5 Eglinton: Laird, Sunnybrook Park, Science Centre and O’Connor, and on Line 4 Sheppard: Bayview, Leslie/ Oriole, and Don Mills. Also on this map are important features including interchange stations, inline stations, existing rapid transit lines, projects currently in delivery, and projects currently in development. Projects in delivery are projects that are under construction or in the engineering design stage. Projects in development are projects that are in advanced stages of planning and design. The yellow solid line represents Line 1 Yonge-University, the solid green line represents Line 2 Bloor-Danforth, and the solid purple line represents Line 4 Sheppard. The narrow light green line represents the GO Rail line travelling through the bottom and through the centre of the map. Projects in delivery include the Eglinton Crosstown LRT, represented by a dashed orange line, and the Sheppard East LRT, represented by a turquoise dashed line. Projects in development include the Yonge Subway Extension, represented by a yellow dashed line, and the Relief Line South, represented by a black line with white dashes inside.

Click here for an enlarged map with additional details on the potential station areas.

How were these station areas identified?

Potential station areas were identified based on:

Major transit network connections:

  • Existing transit network (TTC and GO)
  • Future transit networks
  • 2041 Regional Transportation Plan for the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area
  • City of Toronto’s 15 Year Rapid Transit Network Plan

Locations of major activity:

  • Key destinations
  • Higher densities
  • Existing planning regulations in the City’s Official Plan
Board 6: Long list of corridor options

This map outlines the long list of corridors being considered for the Relief Line North project represented by thick red arrowed numbered lines. Corridor options are numbered one through six and include: 1-Bayview to Finch Station which would go north from Pape Station to Thorncliffe Park, connect with Line 5 Eglinton at Laird Station, head north on Bayview Avenue, connect with Line 4 Sheppard at Bayview Station and connect with Line 1 Yonge at Finch Station; 2-Leslie which would go north from Pape Station to Thorncliffe Park, connect with Line 5 Eglinton at Sunnybrook Park Stop, head north on Leslie Street and connect with Line 4 Sheppard at Leslie Station; 3-Don Mills to Leslie Station via GO Rail Corridor which would go north from Pape Station to Thorncliffe Park, head north on Don Mills Road, connect with Line 5 Eglinton at Science Centre Station, cut across via the GO Corridor north of Lawrence Avenue, and connect with Line 4 Sheppard at Leslie Station and with Oriole GO Station on the Richmond Hill line; 4-Don Mills to Sheppard Avenue East which would go north from Pape Station to Thorncliffe Park, head north on Don Mills Road, connect with Line 5 Eglinton at Science Centre Station, and connect with Line 4 Sheppard at Don Mills Station; 5-Don Mills to Victoria Park which would go north from Pape Station to Thorncliffe Park, head north on Don Mills Road to connect with Line 5 Eglinton at Science Centre Station, and cut across the Don Valley Parkway to Victoria Park Avenue; and, 6-Victoria Park via O’Connor which would go north from Pape Station and follow O’Connor Drive to Victoria Park Avenue. Also on this map are important features including station areas represented by red circles with letters inside, interchange stations, inline stations, existing rapid transit lines, projects currently in delivery and projects currently in development. Projects in delivery are projects that are under construction or in the engineering design stage. Projects in development are projects that are in advanced stages of planning and design. The black circles on the map indicate existing and potential interchange stations and the yellow, green, purple and white circles indicate existing, in delivery and in development inline stations. The yellow solid line represents Line 1 Yonge-University, the solid green line represents Line 2 Bloor-Danforth, and the solid purple line represents Line 4 Sheppard. The narrow light green line represents the GO Rail line travelling through the bottom and through the centre of the map. Projects in delivery include the Eglinton Crosstown LRT, represented by a dashed orange line, and the Sheppard East LRT, represented by a turquoise dashed line. Projects in development include the Yonge Subway Extension, represented by a yellow dotted line, and the Relief Line South, represented by a black line with white dashes inside.

Click here for an enlarged map with additional details on the long list of corridor options.

How were these corridors identified?

Corridors were identified by:

  • Connecting potential station areas; and
  • Serving communities with significant existing ridership

A total of six corridors were identified going north from Pape station on Pape avenue:

  1. Bayview to Finch Station
  2. Leslie
  3. Don Mills to Leslie Station via GO corridor
  4. Don Mills to Sheppard Avenue East
  5. Don Mills to Victoria Park
  6. Victoria Park via O’Connor

Your feedback on the long list of corridors will be considered to develop the short list of corridors.

Board 7: How will we get to a short list of corridors?

A high level evaluation of the long list of station areas and corridors will be conducted to narrow the options for the Relief Line North. The following steps will be taken:

Evaluation 1

Station areas will be evaluated based on impacts to:

  • Natural heritage areas, environmentally sensitive areas, parkland and/or open spaces
  • Flood plains
  • Land uses

Evaluation 2

Corridors will be evaluated based on:

  • Ability to relieve congestion
  • Ability to provide continuous service north of Pape Station
  • Connections to the existing and future transit network
  • Feasibility based on engineering standards
  • Ability to accommodate a Maintenance and Storage Facility (MSF) for vehicles

The Result

  • The short list of corridors

Question: Is there anything else you would like us to consider?

Board 8: Evaluation Criteria

The Relief Line North short list of corridors will be evaluated using the following criteria:

This graphic includes the criteria developed to evaluate the short list of corridors for the Relief Line North as well as the four key features of the initial business case. The evaluation criteria begins with Serving People and includes the following categories: Choice – Develop an integrated network that connects different modes to provide for more travel options; Experience – Capacity to ease crowding/ congestion; reduce travel times; make travel more reliable, safe and enjoyable; and, Social Equity – Do not favour any group over others; allow everyone good access to work, school and other activities. The next criteria is Strengthening Places and includes the following categories: Shaping the City – Use the transportation network as a tool to shape the residential development of the City; Healthy Neighbourhoods – Capacity to ease crowding/ congestion; reduce travel times; make travel more reliable, safe and enjoyable; and, Public Health and Environment – Support and enhance natural areas, encourage people to reduce how far they drive. Lastly, the Supporting Prosperity criteria which includes Support Growth – Investment in public transportation should support economic development; allow workers to get to jobs more easily; allow goods to get to markets more efficiently; and, Affordability – Improvements to the transportation system should be affordable to build, maintain and operate. These criteria are paired with the four features that form the initial business case including the Strategic Case – How does the investment achieve strategic goals and objectives?; Economic Case – What is the investment’s overall value to society?; Financial Case – What are the financial implications of delivering the investment?; and, Deliverability and Operations Case – What risks and requirements must be considered for delivering and operating the investment?

Click here for an enlarged graphic with additional details on the evaluation criteria.

Questions:

What do you think about the evaluation criteria?
Is there anything else you would like us to consider in the evaluation of the potential corridor options?

Board 9: Next Steps

The Project Team will review feedback received during the first round of public consultation and consider all comments and questions related to the corridor options before moving into the next round of consultation.

This diagram is showing the four rounds of consultation for the Relief Line North Project Assessment. Round 1, the current round, includes consultation on the study area, evaluation criteria, problem statement and long list of corridors. Next, Round 2 includes consultation on the short list of corridors and stations, the emerging preferred alignment and the Initial Business Case. Next, Round 3 includes consultation on the conceptual design and the phasing analysis. Lastly, Round 4 includes consultation on the Draft Environmental Project Report, project impacts and associated mitigation strategies.

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